The Care Act 2014

Under the Care Act a new legal framework was introduced for how local authorities and other public agencies should protect adults at risk of abuse or neglect.

Local authorities were given new safeguarding duties including a duty to make (or cause to be made) whatever enquiries it thinks necessary to enable it to decide whether any action should be taken in an adult’s case where:

A local authority has reasonable cause to suspect that an adult in its area (whether or not ordinarily resident there) —

(a) has needs for care and support (whether or not the authority is meeting any of those needs),
(b) is experiencing, or is at risk of, abuse or neglect, and
(c) as a result of those needs is unable to protect himself or herself against the abuse or neglect or the risk of it.

You can read more about the Care Act and find guidance here.

 

Wiltshire Safeguarding Adults Board

To reduce neglect and abuse the Board works across agencies and with local care providers to ensure the right policies are in place and professional are supported.

 

Guidance for professionals If you provide care and support to vulnerable adults please read the Board’s Staff Guide. It’s there to support you if you think an adult with care and support needs is experiencing, or is at risk of, abuse and neglect. The guidance has recently been updated to ensure it reflects the Care Act 2014.

WSAB Staff Guide

 

Accessing training

The Board is working to promote and share access to training that will help improve professional standards and the training that is available to unpaid carers. More information will follow soon.

If you provide training and would like to make your courses accessible to carers in Wiltshire please contact 01225 716693.

 

Making Safeguarding Personal

Safeguarding should be person-centred and outcome-focused. The Board provides assurance that local safeguarding is effective from the point of view of the person being protected by it. All agencies are expected to help enhance the choice and control people have over their lives as well as improving people’s quality of life, wellbeing and safety.

Download the Making Safeguarding Personal toolkit to find out how you can improve practice and change outcomes.

 

Multi-agency policy and procedures

Safeguarding in the UK is governed by the Care Act 2014. Under this legislation local authorities are required to:

  • make enquiries, or ensure others do so, if it believes an adult is, or is at risk of, abuse or neglect
  • set up a Safeguarding Adults Board
  • arrange, where appropriate, for an independent advocate
  • cooperate with each of its relevant partners and supply information
  • carry out safeguarding adult reviews

These duties apply in relation to any person who is aged 18 or over and at risk of abuse or neglect because of their needs for care and support. You can read more about multi-agency policies and the roles of local organisations by downloading our local policy and procedures.

WSAB Policy and Procedures – safeguarding adults at risk in Wiltshire (March 2017)

 

Learning how we can improve services

There are a number of processes that can be used by WSAB to help agencies and partners learn from incidents and practice, and to use these findings to improve local practice and service delivery. These include:

  • Safeguarding Adults Reviews;
  • Audits of multi-agency and single agency practice;
  • Reviews of whole service safeguarding Large Scale Investigations;
  • Reviews of individual safeguarding section 42 enquiries;
  • The Board’s new High Risk Behaviours Policy.

Under the 2014 Care Act, Safeguarding Adults Boards are responsible for Safeguarding Adults Reviews (SARs). The purpose of a SAR is not to re-investigate an incident or to apportion blame, but a review will identify whether lessons can be learned about the effectiveness of professionals and agencies working together to safeguard adults at risk.

Safeguarding Adults Boards must arrange a Review when an adult in its area dies as a result of abuse or neglect, whether known or suspected, and there is concern that partner agencies could have worked more effectively to protect the adult. SABs must also arrange a SAR if an adult in its area has not died, but the SAB knows or suspects that the adult has experienced serious abuse or neglect.

SABs are also able to arrange for a SAR in any other situations involving an adult in its area with needs for care and support. The adult must have needs for care and support, but does not have to have been in receipt of care and support services for a SAR to be considered.

To find out more about how WSAB promotes learning and effective partnership working contact 01225 716693.